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Zanzibar Excursionist

Zanzibar promises a rich, romantic experience for those adventurous couples looking to honeymoon in an exotic location.

Located about 35km off the east coast of Tanzania, Zanzibar is an archipelago consisting of the main island of Unguja (commonly known as Zanzibar), Pemba Island, famous for its deep-sea fishing, and about 50 smaller surrounding islands and coral reefs.

Also known as ‘Spice Island’, Zanzibar is a place like no other. Its history can be traced back to the spice and slave trades and its culture is rooted in the Portuguese, Omani Arab and English traditions. It was an independent country until 1964 when it and several smaller islands became part of the United Republic of Tanzania.

Romance will blossom as you wander the narrow, shaded streets of the capital city Stone Town on a balmy afternoon. With the heady scents of cinnamon, nutmeg and clove in the air, listen to the call to prayer that beckons from one of the city’s 50 mosques.

Its heydey was during the 19th century when the island became the world’s leading producer of cloves; its plantations still produce more than 50 different spices and fruit, and guided spice tours are a Zanzibar speciality.

The chance to relive the allure of long ago can be yours as you and your spouse set sail from Kilele Square in a traditional wooden Dhow for some of the small islands off Stone Town.

Explore the natural beauty the island has to offer from your base at one of the island’s idyllic beach resorts.

Witness schools of brightly coloured fish as you dive and snorkel among coral reefs or see bottlenose dolphins or the magnificence of cresting whales from a chartered boat trip.

Experience the wildlife haven of the Jozani Forest to view the rare indigenous Red Colobus monkey, or join the many residents of Stone Town as they take a lazy stroll through the refurbished Forodhani Gardens at sunset.

Ndutu Calves Safari

NDUTU CALVES

The Ndutu Region forms part of the northern section of Ngorongoro Conservation Area and stretches to the unfenced southern reaches of the Serengeti National Park, a meeting point between these two incredible wilderness areas. This section of the park is made up of rolling grasslands peppered with alkaline lakes that attract flocks of flamingos, as well as acacia woodlands. lake ndutu serengeti

There’s year-round resident wildlife (such as giraffe, elephant, hyena and various antelope species) in the Ndutu Region, and you can spot animals around the waterholes during the dry season from June to November. Look out for the six cat species – lion, cheetah, leopard, serval, African wild cat and caracal – that are present throughout the year.

The best months to visit the Ndutu Region are from December, when the Great Migration herds start to arrive from the north, until April when the millions of wildebeest, zebra and gazelle have trekked northwards again. In the early months of the year – with a peak in February – the wildebeest herds are calving on the verdant grassy plains: thousands upon thousands of baby animals are born every day, attracting the attention of cheetah, lion and hyena.

Highlights

wildebeest calving season serengeti Credit: Legendary Serengeti Camp

A big draw of the Ndutu Region is to see the full circle of the Great Migration, from the return of the herds to graze in December, and then the calving which takes place in January and February, and then the departure of the herds again in April as they start making their journey northwards. Calving season is particularly dramatic: a million wildebeest give birth to 8000 babies every day, and as these newborns take their first steps, they’re targeted by lion, leopard, cheetah and hyena.

The prime game viewing spot in the Ndutu Region is around Lake Ndutu, where enormous herds congregate between December and April to graze and calve. The forests and granite kopjes around Lake Ndutu are also home to lots of game outside of the migration months.

Sightings of six species of cats – leopard, lion, cheetah, caracal, African wildcat and serval – are a big highlight of visiting the Ndutu Region. You can spot the cats throughout the year, but the best viewing is during the calving months of January and February, when these predators pick on the fledgling baby animals.

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